Op-Eds

Dr. Charles Schwertner, Republican Texas State Senator for District 5 from Georgetown.

In the aftermath of the death of medical cannabis bills in Austin during the 2017 session, many point to the time constraints, but few realize that political donors may have led to medical cannabis’ ultimate demise in Texas.

Two marijuana bills which had momentum going into the final weeks of the 2017 Texas legislative session are officially dead, ending any hope for marijuana reform until the next legislative session in 2019.

Protestors marched to the steps of the Tarrant County Courthouse during the Marijuana March of North Texas in 2017.

As I wandered towards Burnett park in Fort Worth on Saturday, May 6th, the musky, skunky smell in the air left no doubt that I was in the right place. In a small green field, a few thousand gathered, listened to music, wandered around a few tents and booths, and

Men have traditionally lead most social movements, but when it comes to prohibition, women cleared mountains previously thought impassable.

Many people in Texas who consume marijuana will still be criminals long after the plant is both decriminalized and legalized.

Changes are in store for Harris County since Democrat Kim Ogg beat incumbent Republican Devon Anderson for the position of District Attorney in the November election. Not only has the new DA implemented a personnel turnover among the ranks of prosecuting attorneys, but she’s also held true to a campaign

No, marijuana hasn’t been legalized in Texas. There is a medical marijuana program but if you are reading this you probably don’t qualify. It also hasn’t been decriminalized, despite everything you see floating around Facebook these days.

Imagine a scene where you are walking down the street with a gram of marijuana in your pocket. Maybe you are going to work, a friend’s house, or perhaps just taking a walk downtown. A police officer stops you, frisks you, and starts going through your pockets. Unfortunately, the Supreme

When President Obama nominated Merrick Garland to fill the vacancy on the nation’s highest court, I was excited to see cannabis news outlets gushing over Garland’s position on cannabis law.

Either Texas legislators don’t know what laws they’re passing, or they’re outright trying to manipulate people.

Twenty-four hours after the walls of the Ft. Worth Convention Center were filled to the brim with Trump supporters screaming “Make America great again!” over 40 speakers, 60 booths, and 6,400 people gathered to learn about one of the fastest growing industries in America, cannabis. The Southwest Cannabis Conference and

By: Marshall Williams I spent this last weekend at the Southwest Cannabis Conference in Ft. Worth, Texas. Throughout the weekend I had the opportunity to meet a lot of movers, makers, dreamers and innovators that make up the ever-growing American cannabis industry. Along with all the vendors and product demonstrations,

By: Russ Belville While I’m out here on the West Coast reporting on the fight to legalize marijuana, I often wonder how my friends in Texas would respond to some of the complaints I hear from marijuana activists here.

Sadly, the fight for marijuana reform will go on forever.