Home»News»Federal government grows moldy marijuana for research

Federal government grows moldy marijuana for research

A marijuana grow room at a dispensary in Colorado.

The federal government grows marijuana for research purposes, however scientists are not happy with the quality, and say that the marijuana they receive is moldy and grown without any substantial standards.

Sue Sisley, a primary care physician in Scottsdale, Arizona, recalls the moment she picked up the carefully wrapped package fresh from the delivery truck. Nearly two years after Sisley and her colleagues were awarded a grant to study marijuana as a treatment for 76 military veterans suffering from chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, her shipment of the drug was finally in hand.

But minutes later, as she opened the packets to weigh the drug – as required by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration – her enthusiasm turned to dismay. It didn’t look like marijuana. Most of it looked like green talcum powder.

“It didn’t resemble cannabis. It didn’t smell like cannabis,” Sisley says. What’s more, laboratory testing found that some of the samples were contaminated with mold, while others didn’t match the chemical potency Sisley had requested for the study.

There’s only one source of marijuana for clinical research in the United States. And “they weren’t able to produce what we were asking for,” Sisley says.

The marijuana came from a 12-acre farm at the University of Mississippi, run by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Since 1968, it has been the only facility licensed by the DEA to produce the plant for clinical research.

Read the whole story at PBS.

The following two tabs change content below.

Stephen Carter

Stephen Carter is a 30 year old journalist and information technology specialist living in Waco, Texas and serves as Deputy Director for NORML of Waco. He has been working with the cannabis movement since 2009. He founded Texas Cannabis Report in 2013 to bring Texans accurate cannabis related news.

Latest posts by Stephen Carter (see all)

Comments

comments

Previous post

Marijuana penalty bill scheduled for hearing in Texas House committee

Next post

Texas legislators receive 33,000 emails supporting marijuana reform

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *